Golf Injuries

These injuries can be caused differently for each shoulder. Try to look at this from a right-handed golfer's position.

Left Shoulder (right-handed golfer):

If there is pain in your left shoulder when you golf, here's what's happening:

The beginning phase of the swing (take-away) the left shoulder and arm comes across the body. This puts only a small amount of strain on the AC joint (top of the shoulder). However, repetitive swings, especially at the driving range, can very slowly damage this joint. Instability and adhesion begins to infiltrate the joint. At this point, the golfer gradually develops tenderness on the top of the shoulder or can even experience a sudden 'pop'. This type of damage eventually causes pain with the 'take away' phase or the 'initiation' of the swing and sometimes the follow thru.

ART and other ligament techniques can...

Right Shoulder (right-handed golfer):

If there is pain in the right shoulder when you golf, here's what's happening:

The beginning phase for the right arm / shoulder is the cocking phase. The arm is held close to the body, but unfortunately is rotated externally (the right elbow stays close and the right hand moves away from the body). This is a very unstable position for the shoulder. When the right arm comes back and then quickly accelerates towards the ball, the rotator cuff is under tremendous amounts of strain (due to the rotation of the arm) and can slightly tear (micro). In this case, the rotator cuff becomes damaged over time and because of the repetitive motion of the swing. The pain the golfer may feel with this type of injury can be more deep in the shoulder and towards the back of the shoulder.